READ & LEARN MORE ABOUT BUNNIES

 

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HIP-HOP IS JUST A START,
HIPPITY-HOP AND I AM IN YOUR HEART!

Looking for an interesting pet that is much more interactive than a gold fish, but not as demanding as a puppy? Bunnies are wonderful childhood (and adult emotional support) pets.  They are an excellent choice for a first pet to help children develop a bond and responsibility for another life.

BUNNIES ARE QUIET

 For families living in an apartment or have nearby neighbors, this eliminates any animal sound concerns.   Bunnies make little to no noise which is wonderful if you are a light sleeper and your pet decides he/she is really a night owl.

BUNNIES REQUIRE LESS SPACE THAN OTHER PETS

  If you have a yard, your bunny will love it.  However, as long as bunnies get a couple of hours of exercise running around outside of their cage in a bunny-safe room, house, or yard, they may be kept in relatively small kennels. The space needs to be large enough for them to stretch out and and hop to their feeding station.  If using a flat bottom cage, allow room for a litter pan in one corner and a feeding station for hay and food in another.  An upside-down box to hide in is a welcomed addition.  If using a grid bottom with pull out tray, their droppings fall to the bottom and a litter box is not needed.

BUNNY TRAINING

Bunnies are great way for children to learn more about the responsibilities of proper animal care, and the potential rewards of interacting with pets through consistent care and training.


Bunnies can be trained not only to use a litter box, but also to run through obstacle courses and to do tricks. Using the principles of positive reinforcement training, rabbit owners can encourage their pets to learn certain behaviors by repeatedly rewarding them with special treats when they perform these behaviors.  Have fun training a few minutes a day, and teach your bunny to jump through hoops, retrieve items and run through mazes.

BUNNIES ARE EDUCATIONAL

Explore permaculture on how bunnies contribute by providing fertilizer and gardens contribute to feeding them.

Enjoy watching the movements and learning the language of another species. Learning to “read” your bunny and understanding how they communicate is one of the joys of sharing your home with your pet. 

Make math fun. Have your child weigh their bunny and pick fresh foods from the garden or supermarket and multiply based on weight how much of each thing to feed their bunny each day.  Builds social skills, solve real world math applications, recipe measuring, and understanding nutrition. 

 

EVERY-BUNNY NEEDS SOME-BUNNY

If you are a vegan/vegetarian and looking for a pet that mimics your lifestyle, consider a bunny.

 

WHY BUNNIES MAKE GREAT PETS

Limited on space, but have a big heart? A bunny may be the best pet for you. 

Are you a Vegan looking for a pet that mimics your lifestyle?

We have bunnies available for adoption.

Be kinder to Mother Earth and enjoy the loving companionship of a bunny. Rabbits are herbivores and only eat plants and grasses. Their food can be grown locally and reduces the carbon footprints by decreasing the "food miles" that many other pets require. 

If you want your pet to live the same lifestyle as you, please do not adopt a cat or dog and deprive it of meat as these pets are carnivores. A bunny is a better choice as it requires the same lifestyle as a vegan and vegetarian. In fact, the bunny is much more earth friendly than a cat or dog.

Permaculture links the needs and outputs of various elements and places them together to work in harmony. Thus, a rabbit offers fertilizer to feed a garden and the garden feeds the rabbit. A rabbit's waste is composed of broken-down hay fibers, which is clean and free from harmful bacteria. Enjoy a vegetable and edible flower garden to feed you and your bunny. You can use both their recycled paper litter and their droppings in a compost pile, which will then fertilize your garden. In fact, rabbit droppings contain a large amount of nitrogen and phosphorus which is essential for flower and fruit production. You don't even have to compost it first; rabbit waste is nutrient-rich and safe to use right from the litter box. If you belong to a gardening club, your rabbit's droppings will be like "gold nuggets" as everyone will want some! 

Rabbits also love dandelion greens. Instead of mowing down and tossing out your unwanted weeds, your bunny will be happy to hop on over and turn your weeds into a yummy meal and fertilizer. Save yourself time in not having to mow. Be careful not to accept donated grass clippings that contain pesticides. 

Rabbits' teeth grow continuously, so they need objects to chew on a regular basis. What is the permaculture way of solving this problem? Avoid wasting your money on an electric shredder. Your bunny will appreciate shredding your unwanted papers. Bunny's will delight in your kindness of sharing your unwanted toilet paper rolls, outdated phone books, and cardboard boxes. Your trash is their toy.

BUNNY GARDEN BUDDY

 

GARDENER’S  DELIGHT - PERMACULTURE

Be kinder to Mother Earth and enjoy the loving companionship of a bunny. Rabbits are herbivores and only eat plants and grasses.  Their food can be grown locally and reduces the carbon footprints be decreasing the “food miles” that many other pets require.  Permaculture links the needs and outputs of various elements and places them together to work in harmony.  Thus, a rabbit offers fertilizer to feed a garden and the garden feeds the rabbit.
A rabbit’s waste is composed of broken-down hay fibers, which is clean and free from harmful bacteria.  Enjoy a vegetable and edible flower garden to feed you and your bunny. You can use both their recycled paper litter and their droppings in a compost pile, which will then fertilize your garden. In fact, rabbit droppings contain a large amount of nitrogen and phosphorus which is essential for flower and fruit production. You don’t even have to compost it first; rabbit waste is nutrient-rich and safe to use right from the litter box. If you belong to a gardening club, your rabbit’s droppings will be like “gold nuggets” as everyone will want some!
Rabbits also love dandelion greens.  Instead of mowing down and tossing out your unwanted weeds, your bunny will be happy to hop on over and turn your weeds into a yummy meal and fertilizer.  Save yourself time in not having to mow.  Be careful not to accept donated grass clippings that contain pesticides.
Rabbits’ teeth grow continuously, so they need objects to chew on a regular basis.  What is the permaculture way of solving this problem?  Avoid wasting your money on an electric shredder.   Your bunny will appreciate shredding your unwanted papers. Bunny’s will delight in your kindness of sharing your unwanted toilet paper rolls, outdated phone books, and cardboard boxes.  Your trash is their toy.

 

INDOOR BUNNIES

  If you have a yard, your bunny will love it.  However, as long as bunnies get a couple of hours of exercise running around outside of their cage in a bunny-safe room, house, or yard, they may be kept in relatively small kennels. The space needs to be large enough for them to stretch out and and hop to their feeding station.  If using a flat bottom cage, allow room for a litter pan in one corner and a feeding station for hay and food in another.  An upside-down box to hide in is a welcomed addition.  If using a grid bottom with pull out tray, their droppings fall to the bottom and a litter box is not needed.

OUTDOOR BUNNIES

Bunnies will dig holes and make a burrow if left unattended for days.  We recommend keeping your bunny in an outdoor hutch at night and letting them free play in a protected area during the day.

HEALTHY DIET

Bunnies should never run out of hay.  Younger bunnies can consume alfalfa, however, older bunnies should be fed primarily Timothy hay or brome hay.

While commercial pellets are available to supplement hay, we recommend offering a fresh organic diet to improve health.


Fresh Diet

75% of the fresh portion of diet should be leafy greens.  Leafy greens are divided into two categories:  High Oxalic Acid and Low Oxalic acid. Leafy Greens need to be rotated due to oxalic acid content and only 1 out of three varieties of greens a day should be high oxalic. 15% can be non-leafy vegetables and 10% can be fruit treats.

It is always preferable to grow organic produce if at all possible. If collecting wild foods such as dandelion greens, make sure they are pesticide-free.

FOODS TO AVOID

Avocado, Bamboo shoots, Dried Beans, Raw Beans: lima, kidney, soy, Bracken Fern, Cassava, Coffee, 

Whole corn kernels (can get stuck in intestines), Iceberg lettuce, Onions, dried peas, Potatoes, Rhubarb, Sweet Potatoes, Tea leaves, Chocolate, Refined sugars, Yogurt drops, Honey/Seed sticks and of course MOLD!

SAMPLE OF A DAILY FRESH DIET

Based on your bunny's body weight you can provide a mix of dandelion leaves, romaine lettuce, and fodder 7-10 days of growth, and young 3 day sprouts for a variety of Leafy Greens.  Give a mini carrot to chew on and when playing provide up to (2) 1/8" slices of banana.  Make sure your bunny never runs out of hay.

LOW ACID LEAFY GREENS

1  1/2 Cups for 4lb Bunny (3/8 cup per lb)

Arugula, Basil (any variety), Bok Choy, Borage leaves, Carrot tops, Chicory, Cilantro, Cucumber leaves, Dandelion greens, Dill leaves, Ecarole, Endive, Fennel (the leafy tops as well as the base), Fodder (sprouted 7+ days), Frisee Lettuce, Kale (all types), Mache, Mint (any variety), Radicchio, Raspberry leaves, Red or green lettuce, Romaine lettuce, Spring greens, Turnip greens, Watercress, Wheatgrass, Yu choy

HIGH ACID LEAFY GREENS

1/2 cup for 4lb Bunny (1/8 cup per lb)

Beet greens, Mustard greens, Parsley, Radish tops, Spinach, Sprouts (1-6 days of sprouting), Swiss chard

NON- LEAFY VEGETABLES

2 Tablespoons for 4lb Bunny (1/2 Tablespoon per lb)

Carrots, Broccoli , Edible flowers (roses, nasturtiums, pansies, hibiscus), Celery, Bell peppers , Brussel sprouts, Cabbage , Broccolini, Summer squash, Zucchini

FRUIT SNACKS

2 Teaspoons for 4lb Bunny  (1/2 teaspoon per lb)

Apple flesh, Apricot, Banana , Berries, Cherries (no pits), Currants, Kiwi, Mango, Melons, Nectarine, Papaya, Peach, Pear, Pineapple flesh, Plum flesh , Star Fruit

WHAT'S UP DOC? . . .PERSONALITY

 

PERSONALITY

Families that have not yet invited these amazing pets into their homes are often surprised by the very distinct personalities of each individual bunny. Yours might use a litterbox like a cat and get excited to see you like a dog.  Each rabbit has a different personality just like each person does.  Some bunnies are rambunctious and playful, while others may be more shy and reserved. Bunnies will recognize you by  voice and sight.  Learn your rabbits language.  A rabbit will teach you a new way of looking at the world!     If you spend time with your bunny she/he will begin to follow you from room to room and jump up on your lap when called. Rabbits lick for affection, not for salt. Licking means “I love you, I trust you.”

BUNNIES ARE QUIET

 For families living in an apartment or have nearby neighbors, this eliminates any animal sound concerns.   Bunnies make little to no noise which is wonderful if you are a light sleeper and your pet decides he/she is really a night owl.

DO THEY GET ALONG WITH OTHER PETS?

Introducing & Bonding are important if you want your pets to co-exist.

BUNNY TRAINING

  Bunnies can be trained not only to use a litter box, but also to run through obstacle courses and to do tricks. Using the principles of positive reinforcement training, rabbit owners can encourage their pets to learn certain behaviors by repeatedly rewarding them with special treats when they perform these behaviors.  Have fun training a few minutes a day, and teach your bunny to jump through hoops, retrieve items and run through mazes.

ADVANTAGES OF SPAY/NEUTER

Bunnies are typically easier to interact with and handle once spayed or neutered. Spaying and neutering reduces hormone-driven behaviors like lunging, mounting, spraying, and boxing. Spaying also protects female bunnies from uterine cancer, which can be quite common in older unspayed rabbits.  Mature bucks will fight each other when not neutered.  Males that are not neutered will mark their territory, including you, other pets, everything in range!

Mounting is a sign of a hormonal rabbit. For altered rabbits, this behavior says “I’m the dominant rabbit and don’t you forget it.” Honking is described as a soft, almost inaudible and is a courting behavior. Honking is usually accompanied by circling. These are signs that your buck has matured and it is time for spaying or neutering.

BUNNY TALK

Bunnies use a variety of body positions and a few vocalizations to communicate to each other and their human family.  Watch patiently and learn the fascinating dialect and personality of your bunny.

Happy feet – Signs your Bunny is happy.

There are several things you can observe to feel good about your bunny being happy.  When a bunny’s hind feet are stretched out fully it means that they are relaxed but ready to move if needed.   Bunnies dance by dashing about the room, frolicking with sideways kicks and midair leaps accompanied by a few head shakes and body gyrations.  When your bunny suddenly flops over on his/her side to expose their belly, it means life is wonderful and they are totally relaxed. Scent glands are located under a rabbit’s chin. She/he may rub with the underside of his/her chin to mark territory – “this belongs to me” -or- “I’ve been here.” Circling is a courting behavior.  Your bunny may also circle you to get your attention. Tooth-clicking, often described as like a cat’s purring, occurs while a rabbit is being petted/stroked or when they are completely relaxed and comfortable with their environment.



Signs your Bunny is Scared or upset

When you rearrange or move items in their cage, some will make a statement of “Don’t touch my stuff” by trying to move it back.  As creatures of habit and when they get things just right, they like them to remain that way.  Lunging is a sign of disapproval.  Lunging may occur when you reach into their habitat to clean, give food, or to take them out.  This is easily remedied by getting the him/her use to whatever is occurring.  Placing your hand on your bunny’s head helps to calm him/her while performing the task. Believe it or not, your rabbit can, and will wag his/her tail. Indicates defiance – “No, I don’t want to go to my cage!” -or- “You can’t make me!” -or- “You’re not the boss of me!” Watch closely and you’ll see that your rabbit will occasionally “back-talk” – they just think you won’t notice!  Rabbits thump to get attention, to express displeasure, fear, or as a warning to others at something seen or heard.

If you can see your bunny’s 3rd inner eyelid in the corner of his/her eye this indicates fright and is a sign of stress.  A tense body, upright tail, laid back ears indicates that the rabbit feels the need to defend itself and is prepared to lunge and possibly bite. Screaming indicates mortal terror or excruciating pain.


Provide what your pet needs, not what you want.

When shown gentleness and love, a bunny will enjoy being with your child and sharing affection.  Bunnies prefer to be on the ground and pet until they develop trust.

The act of a stranger (new pet owner) bending over a bunny and grabbing them by  the bunny’s ribs to pick them up is very similar to being picked up by a hawk – scary!!  Bunny’s are an animal of prey and have the instinct to defend themselves.  Just because you have already fallen in love with the beauty of this fluff ball, doesn’t mean he/she is ready to trust you.  Trust is earned.

The best way to earn trust and build a loving relationship with a bunny is on the floor. Sit in the room while bunny is playing and she/he will soon come to investigate you. She/He will appreciate being petted sitting next to you, but not necessarily while being carried in your arms! Investing in kennel or hutch with a door ramp allows your bunny to go in and out without the need to pick him/her up.

If you are going to pick up your rabbit, make sure you do it correctly. The best way is to place one hand under her rib cage and the other under her bottom, scooping her back legs so she can’t kick. This method will protect her fragile backbone while protecting you from those strong kicking back legs and sharp nails.

The roughness of a child is usually kept in check.  Bunnies will defend by biting, scratching, or boxing offering a quick lesson to be gentle.  Bunnies are docile by nature and any defensive responses are usually well deserved.

Grunts are often angry reactions to a human behavior or towards another rabbit and may be followed by scratching or biting. Rabbits grunt when they feel threatened, or to show their disapproval if they do not want to be handled – means “leave me alone” -or- “back off!” Some rabbits show their disapproval by grunting to protect what is theirs (cage, food, etc.) from a human hand or another rabbit and often, that is the extent of their anger.

Tooth-grinding is your bunny’s way of telling you they are in severe pain, discomfort, or stress.  If you hear tooth grinding and your bunny is sitting hunched up in a corner of a room or cage, he/she is  sick and needs veterinary care immediately.

 

Complex Bunny Language

Understanding why a bunny nips can be complex.  Nipping can mean “I want your attention – NOW!” , “This is a warning.”, or is done in a grooming sense as in “I like that you pet me so, I will groom you.” Nose-nudging means several things in rabbit language: “Pet me now” -or- “Move out of the way” -or- “Pay attention to me.”

Ears are like a rabbit’s radar. They are used for tuning in to what’s going on around them. Their ears are both expressive and inquisitive. Watch to see if you can figure out just what both ears forward, both ears back, or one ear forward and one ear back means.  “Something has caught my attention.” “I’m giving my radar a rest.” “Something is going on which doesn’t yet warrant my full attention.”

 
 

CHILD IS BEGGING FOR A BUNNY NOW, BUT?

We understand that some children and families want the fun of raising a bunny and eventually the child’s enthusiasm for the pet wears out.  If you think there is a chance for this to occur, it is much better to add a bunny to your family as a pet than any other animal.  A bunny doesn’t rely on the emotional connection of living with the same family like a cat or dog requires.  While our hope is that your child will love his/her bunny forever, you may bring the bunny back to the farm for us to provide its future care.

SEASONAL PET

 Some families enjoy sharing their love during the Spring/Summer and being able to bring the bunny back to the farm in Fall/Winter. A bunny has the emotional well being of being able to change friends and families as long as their quality of care stays the same.  Providing the bunny a season of love enriches their lives. The bunnies benefit by being more socialized which is usually what permanent home families are looking for. The following spring families often come back out to select another bunny to share their love with. 

HOW DOES BRING BACK A BUNNY WORK?​

It is as easy as giving us a call, text, or email to schedule a time to bring the bunny back to the farm. For the safety and health of all our farm animals, bunnies need to have a clean bill of health.  We will examine the bunny for health and can only intake bunnies in perfect health.  To be safe, we will quarantine all returned bunnies.  We welcome and appreciate any supplies, toys, cages that come with your bunny so that he/she may continue to enjoy them.

Strasburg, CO 80136, USA

303-359-9484

©2018 by Serenity Sprouts
Local Farming through permaculture routes.
Every life (plant, animal, human) has a purpose that counts.